Japanese Chef Loved Maltese Food So Much He Opened A Restaurant In Tokyo

A little taste of home, while (very far) away.

Tokyo

Well, we always knew Maltese food was amazing - and now we have a Japanese representative to prove it! Found in the heart of Tokyo, マルタ (aka 'Malta') is a quaint little restaurant that serves up some of Malta's favourite specialities - and yes, that includes Cisk.

Cisk

The restaurant, which opened in August, was the brainchild of Takashi Takamiya who came to Malta just over 6 months ago to study our cuisine.

"I spent 18 years working in an Italian Restaurant in Tokyo" he explains, "and then I came to Malta and stayed to learn how to cook Maltese food!"

Shingo

The main man himself, making traditional-ish Gozitan ftira.

"We've had a few Maltese customers since we've opened. Our most popular dishes are Ftira and Bragioli."

The restaurant boasts a vast selection of Maltese dishes including rabbit stew and ħobż tal-Malti. According to a Maltese customer who visited 'Malta' the latter "tastes even better than the local version".

"Everything here is made with love with thought and consideration for each other."

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Burajiori pasta aka Bragioli.

Cropped

Look ma! Our Ħobż is famous.

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Who can say no to a classic stuffat?

And sure, the food looks great. But check out (what should be) the main attaraction of this whole space:

Stained Glass

Boom. That should be a staple in every Maltese household!

You can find out more about the restaurant and how to get there from their Facebook page.

Have you been to a cool Maltese restaurant overseas? Tell us about it on hello@lovinmalta.com 

Share this post with a friend in Tokyo - they may be craving some home cooking!

READ NEXT: Maltese Man Moves To Mexico And Takes Malta's Best Dishes With Him 

Written By

Chucky Bartolo

When he's not writing for Lovin Malta, Chucky spends his time talking puppies, politics, and pop stars (read: Mariah Carey); complete with unnecessarily melodramatic facial expressions.

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